Tag:Cybersecurity

1
“Grandma, I have [not] been kidnapped”: The FCC Bans AI-Generated Robocalls
2
FTC Bans Rite Aid from Using AI Facial Recognition Without Reasonable Safeguards
3
CJEU Decides on Use of Automatically Generated Scoring Values
4
CJEU Holds German Provisions for Imposing Fines on Companies for GDPR Violations Invalid
5
California Privacy Protection Agency Proposes Draft Rules for Automated Decision Making, Including Artificial Intelligence
6
California Proposes Cybersecurity Requirements for Businesses
7
Privacy Awareness Week Part IV – Privacy Priorities
8
Privacy Awareness Week Part III- The importance of being privacy prepared
9
Privacy Awareness Week Part II- Get in the know and get privacy right
10
Privacy Awareness Week Part I- The state of play

“Grandma, I have [not] been kidnapped”: The FCC Bans AI-Generated Robocalls

By: Andrew Glass, Gregory Blase, and Joshua Durham

Effective immediately, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) banned AI-generated phone calls with its recent Declaratory Ruling (the Ruling). Known as audio or voice “deepfakes,” AI can be trained to mimic any person’s voice, resulting in novel scams such as grandparents receiving a call from their “grandchild” and believing they have been kidnapped or need money for bail. FCC Commissioner Starks deemed such deepfakes a threat to election integrity, recalling that just recently, “potential primary voters in New Hampshire received a call, purportedly from President Biden, telling them to stay home and ‘save your vote’ by skipping the state’s primary.”

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FTC Bans Rite Aid from Using AI Facial Recognition Without Reasonable Safeguards

By Whitney E. McCollum and Eric F. Vicente Flores

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a first-of-its-kind proposed order prohibiting Rite Aid Corporation from using facial recognition technology for surveillance purposes for five years.

The FTC alleged that Rite Aid’s facial recognition technology generated thousands of false-positive matches that incorrectly indicated a consumer matched the identity of an individual who was suspected or accused of wrongdoing. The FTC alleged that false-positive matches were more likely to occur in Rite Aid stores located in “plurality-Black” “plurality-Asian” and “plurality-Latino” areas. Additionally, Rite Aid allegedly failed to take reasonable measures to prevent harm to consumers when deploying its facial recognition technology. Reasonable measures include: inquiring about the accuracy of its technology before using it; preventing the use of low-quality images; training or overseeing employees tasked with operating the facial recognition technology; and implementing procedures for tracking the rate of false positive matches.

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CJEU Decides on Use of Automatically Generated Scoring Values

By Dr. Thomas Nietsch

In its judgment dated 7 December 2023 (C-634/21 – Schufa) presented by the Administrative Court Wiesbaden (Germany), the court held that Article 22 of the GDPR (Art. 22 GDPR) applies also to probability values that are created by credit scoring agencies on the basis of personal data and used by third parties in order to decide whether the respective individual is eligible for a credit or establishing a contract.

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CJEU Holds German Provisions for Imposing Fines on Companies for GDPR Violations Invalid

By Dr. Thomas Nietsch

In a judgment dated 5 December 2023 (Case C-807/21 – Deutsche Wohnen) presented by the Higher Regional Court Berlin (Kammergericht), the Court of Justice for the European Union (CJEU) held that a German law permitting administrative fines against corporate entities where an identified legal representative of that entity was proven to have committed a criminal or administrative offence, which at the same time led to the corporate entity breaching its obligations, is not in line with GDPR.

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California Privacy Protection Agency Proposes Draft Rules for Automated Decision Making, Including Artificial Intelligence

By Eric Vicente Flores and Michael Stortz

Executive Summary: The California Privacy Protection Agency has proposed a new set of draft regulations that aim to regulate the use of artificial intelligence and automated decision making technology. These regulations will be discussed alongside other draft regulations the agency has previously proposed regarding risk assessments and cybersecurity assessments. The three sets of draft regulations will be discussed at the agency’s meeting on 8 December.

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California Proposes Cybersecurity Requirements for Businesses

By: Eric Vicente Flores, Avril Love, and Whitney McCollum

In recognition of Cybersecurity Awareness Month in the US, we will be bringing awareness to relevant 2023 cybersecurity updates each week.

On 28 August, the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) published draft regulations regarding risk assessments and cybersecurity audits for consideration at the Board’s September meeting. The draft regulations precede the formal rulemaking process, but provide insight into CPPA’s current priorities.

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Privacy Awareness Week Part IV – Privacy Priorities

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham and Stephanie Mayhew

Given the current privacy reform and cyber threat environment, the question we get asked a lot is – what are the privacy risks that should be assessed in our organisation and how do we prioritise these? Unfortunately this isn’t always a ‘one size fits all’ answer but there are some basic matters you can check as to whether your organisation is considering privacy risks proactively.

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Privacy Awareness Week Part III- The importance of being privacy prepared

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham, Stephanie Mayhew and Dadar Ahmadi-Pirshahid

The APPs require organisations to “take reasonable steps to implement practices, procedures and systems that ensure compliance with the APPs”. Putting your mind to privacy after a data breach or complaint is very much shutting the stable door after Phar Lap has bolted (good luck getting him back!)

Good privacy management starts with a good privacy culture in your organisation. Recommended steps to develop this include:

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Privacy Awareness Week Part II- Get in the know and get privacy right

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham, and Stephanie Mayhew

With the cyber threat landscape significantly evolving, we are seeing companies – large and small – experience attacks. Recent high-profile attacks have shown that these breaches are alarming, targeting a range of sectors. With millions of Australians more concerned about their privacy than ever before, the federal government is making privacy a priority with the Attorney-General’s Department recently releasing 116 recommendations to amend the Privacy Act. The federal government has also made proposals to consider a new Cyber Security Act and strengthen existing laws around this space. 

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Privacy Awareness Week Part I- The state of play

By Cameron Abbott, Rob Pulham, and Stephanie Mayhew

The theme of this year’s Privacy Awareness Week (PAW) is “back to basics”. It’s fitting to consider some lessons arising from recent high-profile breaches affecting millions of Australians, and the consistent messages we’ve been hearing from the Australian Information Commissioner in the midst of those incidents.

Data breaches can happen to anyone. We know cyberattacks can be big business, and sophisticated criminal networks make a good living from these. And if your organisation has taken reasonable steps to avoid or mitigate such breaches, the fact you’ve encountered one will not, of itself, be held against you.

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